See on Scoop.itStory and Narrative


Business storytelling leverages well-crafted narratives in a diverse range of content types. When it’s done well, it can effectively support your brand, forging a strong connection with your audien…


See on contentmarketinginstitute.com

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How great marketers tell stories

by Gregg on April 19, 2014

See on Scoop.itStory and Narrative

“Former P&G marketing chief Jim Stengel says that the best companies tell two types of stories to build strong and enduring brands.”

“The Brand Ideal, or Purpose, of Louisville Slugger is “to make players great.” That statement could sound like puffery, except that the stories surrounding the brand make it plain and true. This is the case for most Ideal-driven businesses. Stories make the Ideal wheel spin.

 Much has been written about the importance of storytelling in marketing and management, but nowhere do tales have a taller order than inside the walls of Ideal-driven companies. They bring definition to the Ideal. They authenticate it and animate it. They inspire and direct its activation.  They reaffirm the course and perpetuate the narrative.”

See on postcards.blogs.fortune.cnn.com

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The Indispensable Power of Story

by Gregg on April 15, 2014

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“Some people have a way of making the complex clear.  They know who they are, why they do what they do, and where they want to go. Because they have internalized all this, they are able to sharply crystallize ideas and vision. They speak in simple, relatable terms. And they can get a lot accomplished.

Making your words understandable and inspirational isn’t about dumbing them down. Instead, it requires bringing in elements such as anecdote, mnemonic, metaphor, storytelling, and analogy in ways that connect the essence of a message with both logic and emotion. Almost everyone leading or creating has a vision, but the challenge is often expressing it in ways that relate and connect. Quick, think of some former Presidents of the United States and presidential candidates. Which ones are most memorable? Which ones are most likable? Which ones won?  The leaders who stick in your mind are likely the ones who humanize their message and deliver it in ways that connect with everyone at some level, in turn inspiring others to relate to them while better appreciating the mission at hand.”


See on blogs.hbr.org

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Nancy Duarte of the Art of Storytelling

by Gregg on April 10, 2014

See on Scoop.itStory and Narrative


Do you know your audience’s resonant frequency? Every time you present to a group — whether that be your colleagues, management team, the CEO, company investors, your customers, or conference attendees — you have an opportunity to connect. However, transmission is only the tip of the iceberg. What all great presenters and communicators have in common is their ability to get you started on a journey — one that will prompt you to do something differently. What causes this change? One of my favorite visual storytellers, Nancy Duarte, has written a remarkable guide on how to present visual stories that transform. Resonate (Amazon affiliate link) is a must read — buy a copy for every member of your team and see the impact on results directly. The book will teach you how to give a presentation and change the world. Changing the world is hard, and you can do that only when the ideas you present connect with people. Stories convey meaning and resonate with people. They are the hero, not you. Therefore every time you present, you’re given an opportunity to plan a journey, tune into the audience’s resonant frequency, and move to action. [more on why stories Resonate here] I had the opportunity to ask Nancy Duarte a few questions recently. Here is our conversation. +++ Great communicators have the ability to go beyond holding attention to moving audiences. The best literally march words into action as it was said about Sir William Churchill. Many have talked about…


See on www.conversationagent.com

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My Kingdom For Some Structure

by Gregg on April 9, 2014

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Producer Bradley Campbell says story structure is a like a map, it shows you were to go. For this episode of HowSound, Bradley drew story structures on napkins (really) and we dissect his drawings. [...]


See on howsound.org

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Story Resumes

by Gregg on April 7, 2014

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Visually AWESOME resumes that TELL YOUR STORY and get you NOTICED


Gregg Morris‘s insight:

I like this site. It’s clean and concise. And I’m fascinated with its  focus on storytelling in the HR world.


See on www.storyresumes.com

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See on Scoop.itStory and Narrative

“For marketers and agencies, Chipotle’s success in brand storytelling points to something fairly profound. Far from the converging paid, earned, and owned media landscapes, some brands are so singularly focused on storytelling that they’re weaning themselves from paid altogether. That should blow your hair back. As Coulter says while discussing the Chipotle account, “We don’t think about commercials.”


See on contentmarketinginstitute.com

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Narrative Leadership Associates

by Gregg on April 1, 2014

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Telling the Story opens a door into the world of narrative leadership, showing how leaders affect our understanding of what is possible and desirable through the stories they tell and embody. This book will help executives, managers and concerned citizens to identify what stories are and how they work; when to tell a story and how to tell one well.

 

It offers a challenge to consider the purposes behind our stories: what are we leading for? It will help practitioners identify their own authentic story and use this to lead convincingly. Using tips, exercises and examples, Telling the Story will help leaders build on their own current practices using the vital art of narrative leadership.   This book is both practical and thought–provoking, to encourage leaders to consider the big stories of our time and how we can use our own stories to create and take responsibility for the kind of future we want.


Gregg Morris‘s insight:

I just had the pleasure of meeting Geoff via email. He seems to be surrounded by a very talented and capable group of folks at Narrative Leadership. I’ll get a review of the book posted as soon as I’ve finished reading it.

 

I encourage you to browse his site. You can also find him writing at cominghometostory.com and leadership.com.

 

I wish that every day started with emails like his in my inbox!


See on narrativeleadership.com

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Meograph

by Gregg on April 1, 2014

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Meograph is the easiest way to create multimedia stories.


Gregg Morris‘s insight:

They’ve just updated their creation interface. It’s easier. It’s much more intuitive. And the mobile experience is excellent.


See on www.meograph.com

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Seth’s Blog: The cure or the story?

by Gregg on March 31, 2014

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“The plumber, the roofer and the electrician sell us a cure. They come to our house, fix the problem, and leave.

The consultant, the doctor (often) and the politician sell us the narrative. They don’t always change things, but they give us a story, a way to think about what’s happening. Often, that story helps us fix our problems on our own.

 

The best parents, of course, are in the story business. Teachers and bosses, too.”


Gregg Morris‘s insight:

Doesn’t say it all. But it gets close.


See on sethgodin.typepad.com

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