The key to success with presentation—and storytelling in general—is to focus not on getting approval or a particular response from the audience, but on giving something meaningful to them. That is, it’s not about getting but about giving.

Source: www.presentationzen.com

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Welcome to Narratopia

by Gregg on February 19, 2015

The challenge of natural story sharing

So I started to think of what sort of game might work with the way people naturally tell stories in conversation. I thought about how:
Storytellers negotiate for the floor by submitting a story abstract to the group. Audience members accept, reject, or modify proposed stories during the story abstract.
Storytellers embed in their story evaluation statements that prove the story is worth listening to, and communicate their intent in telling it. Audience members redirect stories as they are being told by providing feedback, questions, and corrections.
Storytellers negotiate the end of their story (and the return to the normal conversational rhythm) in the story’s coda. Audience members participate in fitting the story into the conversation by asking questions about it and discussing aspects of it.
Audience members respond to stories with related stories, building chains of connected stories in collaborative exploration of a topic.
This all happens without anyone being fully aware that it is happening. You can watch people do all of these things in any casual conversation anywhere in the world, and probably could watch the same thing happen thousands of years ago.

Source: www.storycoloredglasses.com

She got up before breakfast to think this one up! Really great stuff!

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Brand Bullshit Never Sleeps

by Gregg on February 19, 2015

“…the two most ‘dreaded, hated’ words at Apple under Steve Jobs were “branding” and “marketing.

…we understood deeply what was important about the product, what the team’s motivations were in the product, what they hoped that product would achieve, what role they wanted it to have in people’s lives

…The most important thing was people’s relationship to the product. So any time we said ‘brand’ it was a dirty word.”

Source: adcontrarian.blogspot.com

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The Story Factor – “How to” Series

by Gregg on February 17, 2015

Sam Thurman’s story is short (5 minutes) and delightful. Please listen to it before reading my comments so you can have the full listener experience.     Imagery and Present Tense One of …

Source: www.annettesimmons.com

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The problem with pivot points – events that result in major changes in your organization’s history or your personal career – is that they often slip by unnoticed. The significance of the event isn’t recognized until later.

You typically have to dig deep into the past to identify your pivots, the lessons they taught, and the opportunities they created. The reward for digging deep, however, is that past pivot points often uncover story opportunities that can help you define your brand and create memorable story-based content marketing.

Source: contentmarketinginstitute.com

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There’s No Bullshit Like Brand Bullshit.

by Gregg on February 17, 2015

But this is the new ideological world of marketing. Marketing is no longer about meeting the practical needs of customers. It’s about high-minded principles of transparency and co-creating and conversations and… 

Well, I’m afraid I have a very old guy opinion. You want customers raving about your brand? Sell them a good fucking product.

Source: adcontrarian.blogspot.com

Spot on!

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There is a structural/genetic continuity between everyday oral narrative and elaborate literary narratives, with listeners gradually becoming an audience. Literary stories which narrate some character’s oral narrating keep us aware of this

Source: www.academia.edu

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Story colored glasses: My left ear

by Gregg on February 10, 2015

As you know if you read this blog regularly (or as regularly as I write it, anyway), I have strong opinions about some things. For example:
I believe that storytelling should be seen not as an expert skill but as an innate capacity available to all human beings. 
I believe that the benefits of listening to stories and making sense of them should not depend on outside analysts, but should be available to groups of people working together for their own benefit. 
I believe that stories should be seen not as commodities to be consumed but as the lifeblood of families, communities, organizations, and societies. 
I have spent fifteen years working toward these goals, and I am passionate about them. But I’ve also thought a lot about whether being passionate about a goal is a help or a hindrance in meeting that goal. This essay is about those thoughts.

Source: www.storycoloredglasses.com

You’re going to have to invest a bit of time but it will be well worth it!

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If you want to separate your content from your competitors, storytelling is a great tactic to add to your content marketing strategy. Several interesting case studies have shown how the implementation of storytelling can triple sales within one year. The best part is that any business can use storytelling in their content marketing strategy by following these five best practices.

Source: www.searchenginejournal.com

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NFL star Aaron Rodgers surprised four kids on a boating/fishing excursion whose dads are fallen military veterans. Sisters Alexis, Starr, and Kylee apparently

Source: www.inquisitr.com

Big kudos to Aaron Rodgers. If this doesn’t make you shed a tear or two or twenty, you might want to check your heartbeat!

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